Disney Logo FOR YOUR CONSIDERATION
AWARDS 2017
Disney Logo FOR YOUR CONSIDERATION
AWARDS 2017

FOR YOUR CONSIDERATION IN ALL CATEGORIES

BEST PICTURE

PRODUCED BY
KEVIN FEIGE, p.g.a.

BEST DIRECTOR

TAIKA WAITITI

BEST ADAPTED SCREENPLAY

ERIC PEARSON AND
CRAIG KYLE &
CHRISTOPHER L. YOST

BEST ACTOR

CHRIS HEMSWORTH

BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR

TOM HIDDLESTON
MARK RUFFALO
JEFF GOLDBLUM

BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS

CATE BLANCHETT
TESSA THOMPSON

BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY

JAVIER AGUIRRESAROBE, ASC

BEST FILM EDITING

JOEL NEGRON, ACE
ZENE BAKER, ACE

BEST PRODUCTION DESIGN

PRODUCTION DESIGNERS
DAN HENNAH
RA VINCENT
SET DECORATOR
BEV DUNN

BEST COSTUME DESIGN

MAYES C. RUBEO

BEST MAKEUP AND HAIRSTYLING

ENZO MASTRANTONIO
LUCA VANNELLA

BEST SOUND MIXING

RE-RECORDING MIXERS
LORA HIRSCHBERG
JUAN PERALTA
SOUND MIXER
GUNTIS SICS

BEST SOUND EDITING

SUPERVISING SOUND EDITORS
SHANNON MILLS
DANIEL LAURIE

BEST VISUAL EFFECTS

JAKE MORRISON
CHAD WIEBE
KYLE McCULLOCH
BRUCE STEINHEIMER

BEST ORIGINAL SCORE

MARK MOTHERSBAUGH
Los Angeles
New York
San Francisco
London
You must be an invited member of a voting organization to attend For Your Consideration screenings. Your membership card is required for entry.
In Marvel Studios’ “Thor: Ragnarok,” Thor is imprisoned on the other side of the universe without his mighty hammer and finds himself in a race against time to get back to Asgard to stop Ragnarok—the destruction of his homeworld and the end of Asgardian civilization—at the hands of an all-powerful new threat, the ruthless Hela. But first he must survive a deadly gladiatorial contest that pits him against his former ally and fellow Avenger—the Incredible Hulk!

FOR YOUR CONSIDERATION IN ALL CATEGORIES

BEST PICTURE

PRODUCED BY
KEVIN FEIGE, p.g.a.

BEST DIRECTOR

JAMES GUNN

BEST ADAPTED SCREENPLAY

JAMES GUNN

BEST ACTOR

CHRIS PRATT

BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR

DAVE BAUTISTA
VIN DIESEL
BRADLEY COOPER
MICHAEL ROOKER
SYLVESTER STALLONE
KURT RUSSELL

BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS

ZOE SALDANA
KAREN GILLAN
POM KLEMENTIEFF

BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY

HENRY BRAHAM, BSC

BEST FILM EDITING

FRED RASKIN, ACE
CRAIG WOOD, ACE

BEST PRODUCTION DESIGN

PRODUCTION DESIGNER
SCOTT CHAMBLISS
SET DECORATOR
JAY HART

BEST COSTUME DESIGN

JUDIANNA MAKOVSKY

BEST MAKEUP & HAIRSTYLING

JOHN BLAKE
CAMILLE FRIEND
BRIAN SIPE

BEST SOUND MIXING

RE-RECORDING MIXERS
CHRISTOPHER BOYES
LORA HIRSCHBERG
SOUND MIXER
LEE ORLOFF

BEST SOUND EDITING

SUPERVISING SOUND EDITORS
ADDISON TEAGUE
DAVID ACORD

BEST VISUAL EFFECTS

CHRISTOPHER TOWNSEND
GUY WILLIAMS
JONATHAN FAWKNER
DAN SUDICK

BEST ORIGINAL SCORE

TYLER BATES

BEST ORIGINAL SONG

"GUARDIANS INFERNO"
WRITTEN BY
JAMES GUNN AND TYLER BATES
PERFORMED BY
THE SNEEPERS
FT. DAVID HASSELHOFF
Los Angeles
New York
San Francisco
London
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Set to the all-new sonic backdrop of Awesome Mixtape #2, Marvel Studios’ “Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2” continues the team’s adventures as they traverse the outer reaches of the cosmos. The Guardians must fight to keep their newfound family together as they unravel the mystery of Peter Quill’s true parentage. Old foes become new allies and fan-favorite characters from the classic comics will come to our heroes’ aid as the Marvel Cinematic Universe continues to expand.
'GUARDIANS OF THE GALAXY VOL.2': A DIGITAL KURT RUSSELL AND OTHER VFX TRICKS REVEALED
READ MORE
'Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2' VFX spotlight: De-aging Kurt Russell gracefully
READ MORE
Is young Kurt Russell in ‘Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2’ the best de-aging of an actor ever?
READ MORE
Guardians Of The Galaxy Vol. 2: Not Just An Awesome Movie, A Technological Masterpiece Too
READ MORE
Chris Townsend, Visual Effects Supervisor Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2
READ MORE
Guardians of Kurt: Young Kurt Russell & Ego Suppression
READ MORE
Weta Digital Confronts the Monstrous Ego of ‘Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2’
READ MORE
‘Guardians Of The Galaxy Vol. 2’ Is The Redemption Of CGI
READ MORE
“REUNITED”
WATCH THE FEATURETTE
“IN THE DIRECTOR'S CHAIR WITH JAMES GUNN”
WATCH THE FEATURETTE
+

FOR YOUR CONSIDERATION IN ALL CATEGORIES

BEST PICTURE

PRODUCED BY
DARLA K. ANDERSON, p.g.a.

BEST ANIMATED FEATURE

LEE UNKRICH | DARLA K. ANDERSON, p.g.a.

BEST DIRECTOR

LEE UNKRICH

BEST ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY

ADRIAN MOLINA
MATTHEW ALDRICH
STORY BY
LEE UNKRICH
JASON KATZ
MATTHEW ALDRICH
ADRIAN MOLINA

BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY

DIRECTOR OF CINEMATOGRAPHY: CAMERA
MATT ASPBURY
DIRECTOR OF CINEMATOGRAPHY: LIGHTING
DANIELLE FEINBERG

BEST FILM EDITING

STEVE BLOOM
LEE UNKRICH, ACE

BEST PRODUCTION DESIGN

HARLEY JESSUP

BEST SOUND MIXING

RE-RECORDING MIXERS
MICHAEL SEMANICK
CHRISTOPHER BOYES
ORIGINAL DIALOGUE MIXER
VINCE CARO

BEST SOUND EDITING

SOUND DESIGNER / SUPERVISING SOUND EDITORS
CHRISTOPHER BOYES
JR GRUBBS

BEST VISUAL EFFECTS

MICHAEL K. O'BRIEN

BEST ORIGINAL SCORE

MICHAEL GIACCHINO

BEST ORIGINAL SONG

"REMEMBER ME"
MUSIC & LYRICS BY
KRISTEN ANDERSON-LOPEZ
AND
ROBERT LOPEZ
Los Angeles
New York
San Francisco
London
You must be an invited member of a voting organization to attend For Your Consideration screenings. Your membership card is required for entry.

Despite his family’s frustrating, generations-old ban on music, young Miguel (Anthony Gonzalez) is inspired by his idol, the late, great musician  Ernesto de la Cruz (Benjamin Bratt)—and dreams of nothing else. Following a mysterious and otherworldly chain of events, Miguel meets charming trickster Hector (Gael García Bernal), and, together, they set off on an adventure of music and mystery, resulting in the most unusual family reunion.

Directed by Lee Unkrich (“Toy Story 3”), co-directed by Adrian Molina (story artist “Monsters University”) and produced by Darla K. Anderson (“Toy Story 3”), Disney•Pixar’s “Coco” opens in U.S. theaters on Nov. 22, 2017.

TRAILER #1

FOR YOUR CONSIDERATION IN ALL CATEGORIES

BEST PICTURE

PRODUCED BY
DAVID HOBERMAN, p.g.a.
TODD LIEBERMAN, p.g.a.

BEST DIRECTOR

BILL CONDON

BEST ADAPTED SCREENPLAY

STEPHEN CHBOSKY
AND
EVAN SPILIOTOPOULOS

BEST ACTRESS

EMMA WATSON

BEST ACTOR

DAN STEVENS

BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR

LUKE EVANS
KEVIN KLINE
JOSH GAD
EWAN McGREGOR
STANLEY TUCCI
IAN McKELLEN

BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS

AUDRA McDONALD
GUGU MBATHA-RAW
EMMA THOMPSON

BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY

TOBIAS SCHLIESSLER, ASC

BEST FILM EDITING

VIRGINIA KATZ, ACE

BEST PRODUCTION DESIGN

PRODUCTION DESIGNER
SARAH GREENWOOD
SET DECORATOR
KATIE SPENCER

BEST COSTUME DESIGN

JACQUELINE DURRAN

BEST MAKEUP AND HAIRSTYLING

JENNY SHIRCORE

BEST SOUND MIXING

RE-RECORDING MIXERS
MICHAEL MINKLER, CAS
CHRISTIAN P. MINKLER
SOUND MIXER
JOHN CASALI, AMPS

BEST SOUND EDITING

SUPERVISING SOUND EDITOR/SOUND DESIGNER
WARREN SHAW

BEST VISUAL EFFECTS

KYLE McCULLOCH
KELLY PORT
STEVE PREEG
GLEN PRATT

BEST ORIGINAL SCORE

ALAN MENKEN

BEST ORIGINAL SONG

"EVERMORE"
MUSIC BY
ALAN MENKEN
LYRICS BY
TIM RICE
"HOW DOES A MOMENT
LAST FOREVER"
MUSIC BY
ALAN MENKEN
LYRICS BY
TIM RICE

The story and characters audiences know and love come to spectacular life in Disney’s live-action adaptation “Beauty and the Beast,” a stunning, cinematic event celebrating one of the most beloved tales ever told. “Beauty and the Beast” is the fantastic journey of Belle, a bright, beautiful and independent young woman who is taken prisoner by a Beast in his castle. Despite her fears, she befriends the castle’s enchanted staff and learns to look beyond the Beast’s hideous exterior and realize the kind heart of the true Prince within. The film stars: Emma Watson as Belle; Dan Stevens as the Beast; Luke Evans as Gaston, the handsome, but shallow villager who woos Belle; Kevin Kline as Maurice, Belle’s father; Josh Gad as LeFou, Gaston’s long-suffering aide-de-camp; Ewan McGregor as Lumière, the candelabra; Stanley Tucci as Maestro Cadenza, the harpsichord; Audra McDonald as Madame de Garderobe, the wardrobe; Gugu Mbatha-Raw as Plumette, the feather duster; Hattie Morahan as the Enchantress; and Nathan Mack as Chip, the teacup; with Ian McKellen as Cogsworth, the mantel clock; and Emma Thompson as the teapot, Mrs. Potts.

Directed by Bill Condon based on the 1991 animated film, “Beauty and the Beast,” the screenplay is written by Stephen Chbosky and Evan Spiliotopoulos and produced by Mandeville Films’ David Hoberman, p.g.a. and Todd Lieberman, p.g.a. with Jeffrey Silver, Thomas Schumacher and Don Hahn serving as executive producers. Alan Menken, who won two Academy Awards® (Best Original Score and Best Song) for the animated film, provides the score, which includes new recordings of the original songs written by Menken and Howard Ashman, as well as three new songs written by Menken and Tim Rice.

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UPCOMING SCREENINGS

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NOW AVAILABLE ON NETFLIX

“CONDON ALSO BRINGS HIS EXPERIENCE TO THE TABLE   
FOR THE BIG MUSICAL NUMBERS, WHICH ARE AMONG THE   
BEST BITS OF FILM, ESPECIALLY ‘GASTON,’ THE   
LeFOU-LED TRIBUTE TO OUR BOASTFUL VILLAIN. FILMED   
REFRESHINGLY STRAIGHT, IN A SERIES OF WIDE, STABLE   
SHOTS THAT ESCHEW THE FIDGETY EDITING OF MOST POP   
VIDEOS IN FAVOR OF AN OLD-FASHIONED, MGM-STYLE   
PROSCENIUM SPACE, IT'S A DELICIOUS MOMENT,   
TRADITIONAL IN ALL THE RIGHT WAYS.”  

- LESLIE FELPERIN,

“‘Beauty and the Beast’ has the feeling of old-fashioned Hollywood
  grandeur, calling to mind Technicolor extravaganzas such as ‘The Sound of
  Music’ even as it’s loaded with the best of modern effects and techniques.
  In one scene, a gorgeous realization of a meeting between old and new,
  the various pots and objects create a Busby Berkeley-like spectacle on
  the dining room table. The scene is more than clever, more than a historical
  reference. It’s poetry. ’Beauty and the Beast’ creates an air of enchantment
  from its first moments, one that lingers and builds and takes on qualities
  of warmth and generosity as it goes along. It’s a beautiful movie, both in
  look and spirit, one of the joys of 2017.”

- MICK LaSALLE,

“‘Beauty and the Beast’ creates an air of enchantment
  from its first moments, one that lingers and builds and
  takes on qualities of warmth and generosity as it
  goes along. It’s a beautiful movie, both in look and
  spirit, one of the joys of 2017.”

- MICK LaSALLE,

“It’s worth mentioning here because of the nature
  of the happiness, that it’s happiness for everybody.
  This is Condon’s vision of a fairy tale ending,
  one of happiness and inclusion.”

- MICK LaSALLE,

“‘Beauty and the Beast’ has the feeling of old-fashioned
  Hollywood grandeur, calling to mind Technicolor
  extravaganzas such as ‘The Sound of Music.’ In one scene, a
  gorgeous realization of a meeting between old and new,
  the various pots and objects create a Busby Berkeley-like
  spectacle on the dining room table to one of the many
  lively songs by Alan Menken and Howard Ashman.
  The scene is more than clever, more than a historical
  reference. It’s poetry.”

- MICK LaSALLE,

“It’s worth mentioning here because of the nature
  of the happiness, that it’s happiness for everybody.
  This is Condon’s vision of a fairy tale ending,
  one of happiness and inclusion.”

- MICK LaSALLE,
BILL CONDON | DAVID HOBERMAN | TODD LIEBERMAN | TOBIAS SCHLIESSLER | VIRGINA KATZ
BILL CONDON (DIRECTOR)

BILL CONDON (Director) is a celebrated film director and Oscar®-winning screenwriter. His film adaptation of the Broadway smash “Dreamgirls” won two Academy Awards® and three Golden Globes, including Best Motion Picture – Musical or Comedy. Condon directed from his own screenplay and was nominated for a Directors Guild of America Award.

He wrote and directed “Gods and Monsters,” which earned Condon an Academy Award® for Best Adapted Screenplay. He also wrote the screenplay for the big-screen version of the musical “Chicago,” for which he received a second Oscar® nomination. His most recent projects include the drama “Mr. Holmes,” and on stage, the celebrated revival of the musical “Side Show.”

DAVID HOBERMAN, p.g.a. (PRODUCER)

DAVID HOBERMAN, p.g.a. (Producer) is the founder and co-owner of Mandeville Films and Television. He is one of the leading producers in the entertainment industry today, having made his mark on more than 100 movies. His Disney-based company is among the most profitable and respected production labels in the entertainment industry.

Since its founding in 1995, Mandeville Films has produced feature films that have grossed more than $1 billion in domestic box office receipts. Mandeville partners David Hoberman and Todd Lieberman produced the critically-hailed Academy Award®-nominated feature “The Fighter,” starring Mark Wahlberg, Christian Bale, Melissa Leo and Amy Adams and directed by David O. Russell. Produced for $25 million, the film grossed more than $125 million worldwide and earned a host of awards, including an Academy Award® nomination for Best Picture, and Best Supporting Actor and Actress Awards for Bale and Leo.

Upcoming movies include: “Stronger,” the inspirational story of Boston marathon survivor Jeff Bauman directed by David Gordon Green, starring Jake Gyllenhaal, Tatiana Maslany, Miranda Richardson and Clancy Brown; “Wonder,” based on R.J. Palacio’s best-selling young adult novel, to be directed by Stephen Chbosky and starring Julia Roberts, Owen Wilson, Jacob Tremblay and Mandy Patinkin, to be released by Lionsgate.

Under the Mandeville banner, Hoberman also produced “The Muppets,” starring Jason Segel, Amy Adams and Walter, the newest Muppet. Directed by James Bobin and written by Segel and Nick Stoller, “The Muppets” was one of the best-reviewed films of 2011 and earned the Academy Award® for Best Song. Mandeville also produced the next Muppet installment, “Muppets Most Wanted.” Mandeville also produced “Warm Bodies,” the genre-bending “zombie romance” based on Isaac Marion’s novel, starring Nicholas Hoult, John Malkovich and Teresa Palmer, written and directed by Jonathan Levine, for Summit/Lionsgate. Mandeville also executive produced “Insurgent” and “Allegiant,” parts of the “Divergent” movie series.

Disney has been Mandeville’s home for over 20 years, and Hoberman has worked at Disney in some capacity since 1985.

Under the Disney banner, Mandeville produced a string of hits, including the romantic comedy “The Proposal,” starring Sandra Bullock and Ryan Reynolds. “The Proposal” became the highest-grossing romantic comedy of 2009, earning over $317 million worldwide. It was the People’s Choice Award winner for Favorite Comedy Movie.

Hoberman founded Mandeville Films in 1995 and signed a five-year first-look pact with the Walt Disney Studios. In 1999, Hoberman signed a first-look deal for Mandeville at the Walt Disney Studios with Lieberman. Two years later, Lieberman became a co-partner in the company. The company created the award-winning “Monk,” a one-hour series for USA Network. Executive-produced by Mandeville, “Monk” aired for eight seasons.

Prior to forming Mandeville Films, Hoberman served as president of the Motion Picture Group of the Walt Disney Studios, where he was responsible for overseeing development and production for all feature films for Walt Disney Pictures, Touchstone and Hollywood Pictures. During Hoberman’s tenure, Disney was often the top studio in domestic box office grosses. In 1990, “Pretty Woman,” supervised by Hoberman, was the top-grossing film of the year and its soundtrack was the top-selling soundtrack of the year. Hoberman was also behind major blockbusters at the studio, including “Father of the Bride,” “What About Bob,” “Dead Poets Society,” “Ed Wood,” “Dangerous Minds,” “Ruthless People,” “Beaches,” “Three Men and a Baby” and “Honey, I Shrunk the Kids.” While an executive at Disney, Hoberman championed the first-ever full-length stop-motion animation feature, Tim Burton’s “The Nightmare Before Christmas.”

Hoberman started his career working in the mailroom at ABC and quickly ascended in the entertainment business, working for Norman Lear’s Tandem/T.A.T. in television and film. He worked as a talent agent at ICM before joining Disney in 1985.

Hoberman is also a member of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences and the Academy of Television Arts and Sciences. He is a member of the Board of Suffolk University in Boston and on the Board of Overseers at the Hammer Museum, Los Angeles.

TODD LIEBERMAN, p.g.a. (PRODUCER)

TODD LIEBERMAN, p.g.a. (Producer) is a co-owner of Mandeville Films and Television, where he is one of the leading producers in the entertainment industry today. Since its founding in 1995, Mandeville Films has produced feature films that have grossed more than $1 billion in domestic box office receipts. Mandeville partners David Hoberman and Todd Lieberman produced the critically-hailed Academy Award®-nominated feature “The Fighter,” starring Mark Wahlberg, Christian Bale, Melissa Leo and Amy Adams and directed by David O. Russell. Produced for $25 million, the film grossed more than $125 million worldwide and earned a host of awards, including an Academy Award® nomination for Best Picture, and Best Supporting Actor and Actress awards for Bale and Leo.

Upcoming movies include: “Stronger,” the inspirational story of Boston marathon survivor Jeff Bauman, directed by David Gordon Green and starring Jake Gyllenhaal, Tatiana Maslany, Miranda Richardson and Clancy Brown; “Wonder,” based on R.J. Palacio’s best-selling young adult novel, to be directed by Stephen Chbosky, starring Julia Roberts and Jason Tremblay, to be released by Lionsgate and the indie thriller “The Duel,” starring Liam Hemsworth and Woody Harrelson, directed by Kieran Darcy-Smith, also from Lionsgate. Under the Mandeville banner, Lieberman also produced “The Muppets,” starring Jason Segel, Amy Adams and Walter, the newest Muppet. Directed by James Bobin and written by Segel and Nick Stoller, “The Muppets” was one of the best-reviewed films of 2011 and earned the Academy Award® for Best Song.

Mandeville also produced the next Muppet installment, “Muppets Most Wanted.” Lieberman also produced “Warm Bodies,” the genre-bending “zombie romance” based on Isaac Marion’s novel, starring Nicholas Hoult, John Malkovich and Teresa Palmer written and directed by Jonathan Levine, for Summit/Lionsgate. Mandeville also executive produced “Insurgent” and “Allegiant,” parts of the “Divergent” movie series.

Mandeville has the scripted comedy series “Sing It!” for YouTube with the Fine Brothers. Mandeville recently re-upped its first look deal with Disney, which has been Mandeville’s home for over 20 years. Under the Disney banner, Mandeville produced a string of hits, including the romantic comedy “The Proposal,” starring Sandra Bullock and Ryan Reynolds. “The Proposal” became the highest-grossing romantic comedy of 2009, earning over $317 million worldwide. It was the People’s Choice Award winner for Best Comedy of the Year.

Prior to joining Mandeville, Lieberman served as senior vice president for international finance and production company Hyde Park Entertainment, which produced and co-financed such films as “Anti-Trust,” “Bandits” and “Moonlight Mile.” Lieberman established himself at international sales and distribution giant Summit Entertainment, where he quickly moved up the ranks after pushing indie sensation “Memento” into production and acquiring the Universal box office smash “American Pie.”

In 2001, Lieberman was named one of the “35 under 35” people to watch in the business by The Hollywood Reporter. He holds a B.A. from the University of Pennsylvania. Lieberman is a member of the Motion Picture Academy of Arts and Sciences and a judge for the Academy’s Nicholl Fellowship in Screenwriting. He is also a member of the Television Academy and a Producer’s Guild mentor, as well as an active member of the Los Angeles chapter of the Young Presidents’ Organization.

TOBIAS SCHLIESSLER, ASC
(DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY)

TOBIAS SCHLIESSLER, ASC (Director of Photography) is currently lensing Ava DuVernay’s adaptation of “A Wrinkle in Time” for Disney, starring Chris Pine, Gugu Mbatha-Raw and Reese Witherspoon. He has enjoyed a successful partnership with director Bill Condon, as the two first teamed up on Condon’s Academy Award®-winning film “Dreamgirls,” followed by “The Fifth Estate,” starring Benedict Cumberbatch and more recently, the beautifully-shot “Mr. Holmes,” starring Ian McKellen.

Schliessler most recently shot Peter Berg’s Boston Marathon drama “Patriots Day,” starring Mark Wahlberg. Berg and Schliessler previously collaborated on a number of films including the action/drama “Lone Survivor,” also starring Mark Wahlberg; the sci-fi thriller “Battleship”; “Hancock, starring Will Smith; the high school football drama “Friday Night Lights”; and “The Rundown,” starring Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson.

Other notable credits include Tony Scott’s crime thriller “The Taking of Pelham 123,” as well as Antoine Fuqua’s “Bait,” starring Jamie Foxx.

A native of Germany, Schliessler studied cinematography at Simon Fraser University in British Columbia, Canada. He began his career shooting documentaries, and then segued into independent features, television movies, music videos and commercials. Schliessler was honored by the Association of Independent Commercial Producers (AICP) for his cinematography on Audi’s commercial “Wake Up,” in 2000, and Lincoln’s Financial spot “Doctor” in 2001. Both are now part of the permanent archives of The Museum of Modern Art’s Department of Film and Video in New York City. His commercial work also includes ads for such high-end brands as Mercedes-Benz, BMW, Bank of America, Citibank, AT&T and Verizon.

VIRGINIA KATZ, ACE

VIRGINIA KATZ, ACE (Edited by) has worked with Bill Condon for close to 25 years, a feat which is quite rare in the motion picture industry. During that time, Katz edited “Gods and Monsters”; “Kinsey,” for which she was nominated for an America Cinema Editors Eddie Award; “Dreamgirls,” for which she won an Eddie Award; “The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn – Part 1” and “The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn – Part 2”; “The Fifth Estate”; “Mr. Holmes”; and “Beauty and The Beast.”

She honed her craft working with her father, veteran film editor Sidney Katz, for whom she served as assistant editor and co-editor.

“‘BEAUTY AND THE BEAST’ MARRIES VISUAL SPECTACLE
AND SUMPTUOUS DESIGN WORK WITH A BETTER STORY
THAN ITS ORIGINAL, CASTING A SPELL ON OLD FANS
AND NEWCOMERS ALIKE.

LYRICS BY THE LATE HOWARD ASHMAN THAT WERE CUT
FROM THE ANIMATED FILM ARE ADDED BACK HERE,
AND ORIGINAL COMPOSER ALAN MENKEN AND LYRICIST
TIM RICE ARE OBVIOUSLY GOING FOR NEXT YEAR'S
ORIGINAL SONG OSCAR WITH NEW NUMBERS.”

- BRIAN TRUITT,
“HOW DOES A MOMENT LAST FOREVER”
MUSIC BY
ALAN MENKEN
LYRICS BY
TIM RICE
“EVERMORE”
MUSIC BY
ALAN MENKEN
LYRICS BY
TIM RICE

“THIS LIVE-ACTION/DIGITAL HYBRID, DIRECTED BY BILL CONDON AND STARRING
EMMA WATSON AND DAN STEVENS IN THE TITLE ROLES, IS MORE THAN A FLESH-
AND-BLOOD (AND PROSTHETIC FUR-AND-HORNS) REVIVAL OF THE 26-YEAR-OLD
CARTOON, AND MORE THAN A DUTIFUL TRIP BACK TO THE POP-CULTURE FAIRY-TALE
WELL. ITS CLASSICISM FEELS UNFORCED AND FRESH. ITS ROMANCE NEITHER WINKS
NOR PANDERS. IT LOOKS GOOD, MOVES GRACEFULLY AND LEAVES A CLEAN AND
INVIGORATING AFTERTASTE. I ALMOST DIDN'T RECOGNIZE THE FLAVOR:
I THINK THE NAME FOR IT IS JOY.”

- A. O. Scott,

“Visually, ‘Beauty and the Beast’ is spectacular.
Costumes, hair and makeup, visual effects, art direction,
and set designs are top notch and likely top contenders
for some award season love at year’s end. The film
blends real life actors and sets with the CGI and other
effects work to excellent effect. It’s a gorgeous,
entertaining, amusing fairy tale come to vivid life.”

- MARK HUGHES,

“A Rococo confection featuring fiendishly intricate
production values, a bravura, coloratura-rich
musical score and whizz-pop state-of-the-art effects…
‘Beauty and the Beast’ is more than just eye candy.”

- LESLIE FELPERIN,

“Most strikingly, the film has taken Belle, one of Disney’s
stalwart princesses for nearly three decades,
and upgraded her for the 21st century.”

- TUFAYEL AHMED,

“Beauty and the Beast’s feminist reimagining is empowering
for the millions of young girls who will fill theaters
around the world to see it.”

- TUFAYEL AHMED,

“‘A tale as old as time;’ yes. But Disney and Condon have found
v a way to breathe some new life into it.”

- TUFAYEL AHMED,

BEST ADAPTED SCREENPLAY

WRITTEN BY
STEPHEN CHBOSKY
AND
EVAN SPILIOTOPOULOS

FOR YOUR CONSIDERATION IN ALL CATEGORIES

BEST ANIMATED FEATURE

BRIAN FEE
KEVIN REHER, p.g.a.

BEST DIRECTOR

BRIAN FEE

BEST ADAPTED SCREENPLAY

KIEL MURRAY
BOB PETERSON
MIKE RICH
ORIGINAL STORY BY
BRIAN FEE
BEN QUEEN
EYAL PODELL &
JONATHON E. STEWART

BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: LIGHTING
KIM WHITE
DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: CAMERA
JEREMY LASKY

BEST FILM EDITING

JASON HUDAK

BEST ART DIRECTION

PRODUCTION DESIGNERS
WILLIAM CONE
JAY SHUSTER

BEST SOUND MIXING

RE-RECORDING MIXERS
MICHAEL SEMANICK
NATHAN NANCE
TOM MYERS
ORIGINAL DIALOGUE MIXER
VINCE CARO

BEST SOUND EDITING

SOUND DESIGNER/SUPERVISING SOUND EDITOR
TOM MYERS
SUPERVISING SOUND EDITOR
BRIAN CHUMNEY

BEST VISUAL EFFECTS

JON REISCH

BEST ORIGINAL SCORE

RANDY NEWMAN

BEST ORIGINAL SONG

"RUN THAT RACE"
WRITTEN BY
DAN AUERBACH
"RIDE"
WRITTEN BY
ZZ WARD
EVAN BOGART &
DAVE BASSETT
Los Angeles
New York
San Francisco
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Blindsided by a new, faster generation of competitors, the legendary Lightning McQueen (Owen Wilson) is suddenly faced with irrelevance. To kick-start a new beginning, his sponsor pairs him with an eager young trainer, Cruz Ramirez (Cristela Alonzo) and their uneasy collaboration leads to unexpected adventures, impressive results, and the biggest showdown of McQueen’s career. Directed by Brian Fee (storyboard artist “Cars,” “Cars 2”), produced by Kevin Reher (“A Bug’s Life,” “La Luna” short) and co-produced by Andrea Warren (“LAVA” short).

BEST ORIGINAL SCORE

RANDY NEWMAN

With songs that run the gamut from heartbreaking to satirical and a host of unforgettable film scores, RANDY NEWMAN (Original Score Composed & Conducted by) has used his many talents to create musical masterpieces widely recognized by generations of audiences.

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BEST ORIGINAL SONG

“RUN THAT RACE”
WRITTEN BY
DAN AUERBACH
“RIDE”
WRITTEN BY
ZZ WARD, EVAN BOGART & DAVE BASSETT
“Compelling, relevant, surprising and visually stunning.”
“Electric. Smartly engineered.”
“A Progressive Vision.”
“Sweet and polished.”

FOR YOUR CONSIDERATION

BEST ANIMATED SHORT

BEST DIRECTOR

DAVE MULLINS

PRODUCED BY

DANA MURRAY
When a toy-stealing bully ruins recess for a playground full of kids, only one thing stands in his way: the “Lost and Found” box.
DAVE MULLINS | DANA MURRAY
DAVE MULLINS (DIRECTOR)
PIXAR ANIMATION STUDIOS

Dave Mullins joined Pixar Animation Studios in September 2000. His first project was working as a pre-production animator on the Academy Award®-winning film, “Finding Nemo.” From there he went on to animate on a number of Pixar feature films including “Monsters Inc.,” “The Incredibles” and “Ratatouille.” Mullins was an animator on the Golden Globe-winner, “Cars” and the short film “One Man Band” and worked as directing animator on another Academy Award®-winner, “Up.” Mullins then was tasked as a supervising animator on, “Cars 2,” and additionally contributed his animation skills to “Brave,” “Inside Out” and “The Good Dinosaur.” Most recently, Mullins made his directorial debut on Pixar’s new short, “Lou,” set to open in front of “Cars 3” in Summer 2017.

A lifelong lover of movies, cartoons and drawing, Mullins was determined to land a job as an artist. While studying painting in art school, he found a RISC 6000 computer in the computer lab storage closet and taught himself how to use it. After creating his first animation of a walking coat hanger, he was hooked. He graduated Rhode Island School of Design with a Bachelor’s of Fine Art in Illustration and was able to secure his first job in the movies creating animated concession stand ads for theatres.

Prior to coming to Pixar, Mullins' early résumé includes such production companies as Pike Productions, The Post Group, Acclaim Entertainment, Walt Disney Animation Studios, Dream Quest Images, Digital Domain and Sony Pictures Imageworks.

Mullins currently lives in Moraga, California with his wife, their two children and dog, Pickles.

DANA MURRAY (PRODUCER)
PIXAR ANIMATION STUDIOS

Dana Murray joined Pixar Animation Studios in June 2001 as a desk production assistant on “Finding Nemo.” She soon served as the art and technology coordinator on several short films including “Boundin’,” “One Man Band” and “Lifted.” Murray continued on as a lighting coordinator for “Cars,” and held a variety of department manager positions on the Academy Award©-winning feature films “Ratatouille,” “Up,” and “Brave.” Murray moved on to be the production manager for the Academy Award®-winning film, “Inside Out,” and most recently produced her first short film, “Lou,” set to release on Summer 2017 in front of “Cars 3.”

Raised in Placerville, CA, Murray attended Sonoma State University. She currently resides in Oakland, CA with her husband, their two girls and dog, Gracie.

With songs that run the gamut from heartbreaking to satirical and a host of unforgettable film scores, RANDY NEWMAN (Original Score Composed & Conducted by) has used his many talents to create musical masterpieces widely recognized by generations of audiences.

After starting his songwriting career as a teenager, Newman launched into recording as a singer and pianist in 1968 with his self-titled album Randy Newman. Throughout the 1970s he released several other acclaimed albums such as: 12 Songs, Sail Away, and Good Old Boys. In addition to his solo recordings and regular international touring, Newman began composing and scoring for films in the 1980s. The list of movies he has worked on includes “The Natural, Awakenings,” “Ragtime,” all three “Toy Story” pictures, “Seabiscuit,” “James and the Giant Peach,” “A Bug’s Life,” “Cars” and “Monsters University.”

The highly praised 2008 Nonesuch Records release Harps and Angels was Newman’s first album of new material since 1999.

In 2011, Nonesuch released a live CD and DVD recorded at London’s intimate LSO St. Luke’s, an 18th-century Anglican church that has been restored by the London Symphony Orchestra, where he was accompanied by the BBC Concert Orchestra, conducted by Robert Ziegler.

The Randy Newman Songbook Vol. 3, which is the third in a series of new solo piano/vocal recordings of his songs from his six-decade career, was released in 2016, along with a boxed set of all three Songbook albums.

Additionally, Newman released “Putin,” a satirical song about the infamous Russian leader, in the fall of 2016. The song is from his forthcoming album of new material, due from Nonesuch in spring 2017.

Newman’s many honors include six Grammys®, three Emmys®, and two Academy Awards®, as well as a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. He was inducted into the Songwriters Hall of Fame in 2002 and the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2013—the same year he was given an Ivor Novello PRS for Music Special International Award. Newman was presented with a PEN New England Song Lyrics of Literary Excellence Award in June 2014.

“BACK TO LIFE” FEATURETTE

The story and characters audiences know and love come to spectacular life in Disney’s live-action adaptation “Beauty and the Beast,” a stunning, cinematic event celebrating one of the most beloved tales ever told. “Beauty and the Beast” is the fantastic journey of Belle, a bright, beautiful and independent young woman who is taken prisoner by a Beast in his castle. Despite her fears, she befriends the castle’s enchanted staff and learns to look beyond the Beast’s hideous exterior and realize the kind heart of the true Prince within. The film stars: Emma Watson as Belle; Dan Stevens as the Beast; Luke Evans as Gaston, the handsome, but shallow villager who woos Belle; Kevin Kline as Maurice, Belle’s father; Josh Gad as LeFou, Gaston’s long-suffering aide-de-camp; Ewan McGregor as Lumière, the candelabra; Stanley Tucci as Maestro Cadenza, the harpsichord; Audra McDonald as Madame de Garderobe, the wardrobe; Gugu Mbatha-Raw as Plumette, the feather duster; Hattie Morahan as the Enchantress; and Nathan Mack as Chip, the teacup; with Ian McKellen as Cogsworth, the mantel clock; and Emma Thompson as the teapot, Mrs. Potts.

Directed by Bill Condon based on the 1991 animated film, “Beauty and the Beast,” the screenplay is written by Stephen Chbosky and Evan Spiliotopoulos and produced by Mandeville Films’ David Hoberman, p.g.a. and Todd Lieberman, p.g.a. with Jeffrey Silver, Thomas Schumacher and Don Hahn serving as executive producers. Alan Menken, who won two Academy Awards® (Best Original Score and Best Song) for the animated film, provides the score, which includes new recordings of the original songs written by Menken and Howard Ashman, as well as three new songs written by Menken and Tim Rice.

Women of Beauty and the Beast

THE WOMEN OF 'BEAUTY AND THE BEAST’

In a fitting tribute to the story’s notion of female empowerment, all the department heads on the design team – many of whom are frequent collaborators of director Bill Condon – are female, as was the film editor and the casting director, and all are at the top of their game creatively. Greenwood and Spencer have worked together for almost two decades and both have worked with Durran and Shircore before, and each was passionate about the project, sharing ideas and information between the other department heads, which helped to create seamless integration.

As production designer, Greenwood is essentially in charge of every visual aspect of the film, and with “Beauty and the Beast” she was striving for a timeless, European feel in the tradition of the great Hollywood romances. The story is set in a specific time and place – mid-18th century France – as opposed to an undated alternate fairy tale universe, and while each department’s work was influenced, in part, by the 1991 animated film, the sets, props, costumes and hair and make-up were authentic to 18th century life in France. Since the story is, in fact, a fairy tale, there was some freedom to visually interpret the period so as to provide a somewhat original look.

“The goal isn’t to have the audience think, ‘That looks just like the castle in the animated film,’” says Greenwood. “Instead, you want the audience to feel that this is, in fact, the Beast’s castle, because every detail faithfully supports the story they know and love.”

Over 1,000 crew members worked around the clock to build and decorate all the mammoth sets, providing an incredible amount of hand-detailed artistry. According to Emma Watson, “I’ve worked on films before where the craftsmanship has been amazing, but this film has been really special because they’ve taken something which is so well known and loved and somehow managed to keep what we know and love but also expand on it and give it more detail and more depth and more layers. Everyone felt there was so much more to explore, and fortunately that was something we could do with the current technology and craftsmanship and means of storytelling that we didn’t have before.”

The fictional town of Villeneuve, the village where Belle and her father live, was built on the backlot at Shepperton. For the production’s largest set (measuring 28,787 square feet), Greenwood and her team drew inspiration from the village of Conques in Southern France. Included in the town, which was named after the author of the original “Beauty and the Beast” story, Gabrielle-Suzanne Barbot de Villeneuve, is Belle’s cottage, a school house, a dress shop, a village tavern, a church and the village square.

For the film’s epic opening number, “Belle,” which takes place in Villeneuve, more than 150 extras, hundreds of animals, 28 wagons and countless props and set decorations were used, each with an incredible amount of detail.

The art department spent months researching period architecture and interior design to create the look of the Prince/Beast’s castle. In the end, it was a combination of different architectural styles, but the majority was French Rococo, a style prevalent in 1740s France used in the design of such notable structures as the Palace of Versailles. “Rococo was a French design style where the motif was quite extreme,” says Greenwood. “It was a very short-lived design theme because it was so intense and excessive and very expensive, but it did have a big impact on the overall visual look of our film.”

One significant difference between this castle and the castle from the animated film is its evolving look. Greenwood explains, “The castle in the animated film does not change over the course of the story, but because we’re working within a live-action format we were able to show the castle reacting to the effects of the spell as time goes by. With Rococo, everything is very exuberant, but also very organic, and what we wanted to convey in our designs was it slowly growing and stretching – post enchantment – which is reflected in the castle’s frost, topiaries, architecture and plaster moldings.”

The castle’s ballroom is another massive set. The floor is made from 12,000 square feet of faux marble and its design is based on a pattern found on the ceiling of the Benedictine Abbey in the Czech Republic.

Also included are ten glass chandeliers – each measuring 14 feet x 7 feet – which are based on actual chandeliers from Versailles which were then frosted, covered in fabric and candlelit.

Belle’s bedroom, like the ballroom, is located in the benevolent enchantment area of the castle and is designed to appeal to every little girl as the ideal fairy tale bedroom. The west wing, where the Beast often retreats, is the epicenter of the enchantment and is designed in Italian baroque, which is more sinister and dark in appearance.

The castle’s library is based on the design of a celebrated library in Portugal and is a key setting and relevant to an important theme in the story: the thirst for knowledge and the vital role books play in feeding the imagination. The floor is made from approximately 2,000 square feet of faux marble and features thousands of books which were created especially for the production.

The enchanted forest that surrounds the Beast’s castle was built on stage H, the largest stage at Shepperton, measuring 9,600 square feet. The forest, which took 15 weeks to complete, includes real trees, hedges, a frozen lake, a set of 29-foot high ice gates and approximately 20,000 icicles.

“All the sets were truly magical and incredibly lavish,” says visual effects producer Steve Gaub (“Unbroken,” “TRON: Legacy”), “And Sarah and her team did an amazing job. Everything felt very old Hollywood, which is appropriate because were looking to create something classic which could sit beside the original.”

Designing costumes befitting a fairy tale world is a prodigious undertaking, but it is one Jacqueline Durran took in stride. Her department, which was comprised of embroiders, milliners, jewelers, painters and textile artists, began working three months prior to principal photography. This was due, in part, to the challenge they gave themselves to design and create ethical and sustainable costumes made from fair-trade fabrics (meaning the use of organic materials from suppliers that pay their employees a fair wage and are considerate of the environment), which they achieved. And, working in tandem with Eco Age and the Green Carpet Challenge, the department used natural and low impact dyes (carefully disposing of any waste water) and printed with traditional wood blocks.

Durran designed everything from the peasant costumes for all the villagers to the elaborate ball gowns worn by 35 debutantes at the Prince’s ball, but her biggest hurdle was creating the dress Belle wears when she dances with the Beast in the castle ballroom. Because of the iconic association with the yellow dress and the character, the design process was lengthy, involving numerous discussions as to its look, color and the material used.

“The dress was always going to be yellow in our film as an homage to the animation,” says Durran. “What we tried to do was re-interpret it and flesh it out a bit by adding more texture and making it feel like a real living costume.” In the end, the dress was created from multiple layers of feather light satin organza dyed yellow (180 feet in total), which was cut broadly in a circular shape and required 3,000 feet of thread.

The top two layers were printed with gold leaf filigree in a pattern matching the ballroom’s Rococo floor and accentuated with 2,160 Swarovski crystals. In the story, Garderobe, the wardrobe, takes gold gilding from the ceiling of Belle’s bedroom and sprinkles it onto the dress. The dress, which took over 238 hours to make and of which multiple copies were made, did not require a corset or cage so as to give Emma Watson a greater amount of movement, as this Belle is more active than the Belle from the animated film.

“It was definitely an interesting challenge,” says Watson, “The dress itself is so iconic because it is part of that romantic scene in the story. The dress went through a lot of different iterations, but, in the end, we decided the most important thing was that the dress dance beautifully. We wanted it to feel like it could float, like it could fly.”

Durran agrees, saying, “We actually took this into consideration when designing all of Belle’s costumes. We didn’t want her to be a delicate princess but an active heroine, so the blue dress and apron she wears at the beginning of the film was designed with pockets where she could place a book and to be worn with bloomers and a bodice.”

This Belle is seen working with and riding her horse, Philippe, and wears boots in those scenes (as opposed to delicate feminine shoes). “We really wanted to expand Belle’s persona in the film and wanted to make sure she came across as a genuine equestrian and horsewoman,” says Watson, “So we made sure she had proper footwear and hiked up one side of her skirt so she could ride western style and that it looked easy for her.”

The design on the gown Belle wears at the end of the film, once the spell has been lifted, is a print taken from an original 18th century apron that Durran bought when she was a student. The design was hand painted on a canvas and enlarged and printed digitally. “The expectations for all of Belle’s costumes were quite high,” says Durran, “But we ended up with some beautiful dresses that reference the animated film but are still unique to this one.”

“One of the wonderful things about working with Jacqueline is that she is so incredibly collaborative,” says Watson. “I was just blown away by how much input she wanted from me…she really wanted to understand how I perceived the character inside and out. It was such a special experience for me as an actress, and such a great way to build and understand a character through that process.”

For the Prince’s costume worn in the opening sequence of the film, Durran created a coat and waistcoat embellished with thousands of Swarovski crystals, which was then scanned by the visual effects department and applied to the computer-generated Beast.

“Jackie is a goddess,” says producer David Hoberman. “She had a really tough job, not only because of the sheer volume of costumes in this movie, but because of the iconic wardrobe from the animated film.

She wanted to take into consideration and be somewhat faithful to the costumes worn by all the animated characters, but wanted to create something original as well, and she managed to come up with something completely beautiful and completely her own.”

“DRESSING THE PART” FEATURETTE

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